PROGRAM PROFILE

Queen's University - Psychiatry - Kingston

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CONTACT INFORMATION

Program Director

Dr. Eric Prost

CONTACT

Program Assistant

Sharon Thompson

GENERAL INFORMATION

Check out our brochure!


FAQ

How many residents are in your program?

We usually have 6-7 residents per year, for a total group of about 35.



Is Competence-Based Medical Education (CBME) working in your program?

All residency programs at Queen’s have been using CBME for four years. We had permission to launch this ahead of other schools. We have accumulated considerable expertise and practice in this curriculum model (and years before the COVID-19 pandemic). While there are always wrinkles to iron out, it is working well, and we have now implemented the Royal College’s Competence By Design curriculum. Our faculty are familiar with the processes of the CBME program.



When was the last accreditation?

The last accreditation review was in October 2018; the Queen’s Psychiatry program was fully accredited.



Are faculty approachable?

Absolutely. The faculty: resident ratio allows lots of interaction. We have three main hospitals that are walking/biking distance. Because of our small-to-moderate size, you will see the members of the psychiatry department often. We have an open-door policy (of course with masks), so you can easily discuss research questions, clinical issues, and the best restaurants with faculty without trying to track us down. We pride ourselves on this.



What is the call commitment for residents in the program?

We utilize a “buddy” call system with one junior and one senior resident on per shift. The call schedule is created collaboratively with all residents, and each resident is assigned an average of 3 shifts per 28-day block.



Is the full range of learning experiences in psychiatry available at Queen’s?

Because of we are the only tertiary centre in southeastern Ontario, we have a wide range of possible experiences.


In addition to the foundation of adult, child/youth, and geriatric divisions, these include the following: forensic psychiatry, correctional psychiatry (in federal corrections institutions), early intervention in psychosis, perinatal psychiatry, adult and child urgent clinics, rehabilitation of persistent mental illness, a specific division of developmental disabilities psychiatry, day hospital, shared-care with general practitioners, and more. There is also up to 6 months available for elective rotations in PGY4/5 that can be used to enhance the resident experience.



What research opportunities are available for residents in your program?

All residents are expected to complete a scholarly project as part of their training, which can take many forms. There are a number of faculty engaged in research in various areas of psychiatry with small and large projects. Residents are given one block in their first year to devote to research, to help them get started on a project of interest. Residents also present at Grand Rounds, Journal Club and the annual Departmental Research Day. For those with an interest in pursuing a Master’s or PhD, the Clinician Investigator Program is another potential option.


Because of we are the only tertiary centre in southeastern Ontario, we have a wide range of possible experiences.


In addition to the foundation of adult, child/youth, and geriatric divisions, these include the following: forensic psychiatry, correctional psychiatry (in federal corrections institutions), early intervention in psychosis, perinatal psychiatry, adult and child urgent clinics, rehabilitation of persistent mental illness, a specific division of developmental disabilities psychiatry, day hospital, shared-care with general practitioners, and more. There is also up to 6 months available for elective rotations in PGY4/5 that can be used to enhance the resident experience.



What research opportunities are available for residents in your program?

All residents are expected to complete a scholarly project as part of their training, which can take many forms. There are a number of faculty engaged in research in various areas of psychiatry with small and large projects. Residents are given one block in their first year to devote to research, to help them get started on a project of interest. Residents also present at Grand Rounds, Journal Club and the annual Departmental Research Day. For those with an interest in pursuing a Master’s or PhD, the Clinician Investigator Program is another potential option.



Is Kingston a small town?

No, but it’s a small city. It’s vibrant, beautiful, and grows on you (although Kingston is usually loved at first sight). Its health care catchment is large, so it is a true tertiary centre for medicine with the health-care resources and medical community usually associated with large cities. Kingston also has a large and vibrant student population.


Its downtown is walkable with an over-abundance of great restaurants (including great take-out during COVID).


Kingston is located where Lake Ontario meets the St. Lawrence River. It is nestled in the Frontenac arch where the Canadian Shield stretches south, so, within 20 minutes you can be in rocky cottage country kayaking on deep lakes or hiking. Prince Edward County with its beaches and many wineries is an hour away and a popular day trip or weekend getaway destination.


We are halfway in between Toronto and Montreal with Ottawa to the north and the US border with New York State on the other side of the river.


Please see the program description on the CaRMS website for more details about our program.


Queen's Psychiatry


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The program information on this website is in the language that the program is offered in.
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